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Rule 3.03 - Written Interrogatories; Filing of Discovery Material; Exchange of Discovery Request by Computer Disk

(a) Written interrogatories shall be so prepared and arranged that a blank space shall  be provided after each separately numbered interrogatory. The space shall be reasonably calculated to enable the answering party to insert the answer within the space.

(b) The original of the written interrogatories and a copy shall be served on the party towhom the interrogatories are directed, and copies on all other parties. No copy of the written interrogatories shall be filed with the Court by the party propounding them. The answering party shall use the original of the written interrogatories for his answers and objections, if any; and the original shall be returned to the party propounding the interrogatories with copies served upon all other parties. The interrogatories as answered or objected to shall not be filed with the Court as a matter of course, but may later be filed by any party in whole or in part if necessary to presentation and consideration of a motion to compel, a motion for summary judgment, a motion for injunctive relief, or other similar proceedings.

(c) Notices of the taking of oral depositions shall not be filed with the Court as a matter of course (except as necessary to presentation and consideration of motions to compel); and transcripts of oral depositions shall not be filed unless and until requested by a party or ordered by the Court.

(d) Requests for the production of documents and other things, matters disclosed pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 26, and requests for admission, and answers and responses thereto, shall not be filed with the Court as a matter of course but may later be filed in whole or in part if necessary to presentation and consideration of a motion to compel, a  motion for summary judgment, a motion for injunctive relief, or other similar proceedings.

(e) Litigants' counsel should utilize computer technology to the maximum extent possible in all phases of litigation (i.e., to serve interrogatories on opposing counsel with a copy of the questions on computer disk in addition to the required printed copy).